yellow clock
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BRILLIANT Portland’s Schoolhouse Electric launched its new housewares and furniture line with crisp, practical beauties like this sharp wall clock ($235). Local designers such as Adam Arnold and Egg Press contributed to the light-fixture brand’s major makeover. schoolhouseelectric.com

unhappy hipster
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NIGHTSTAND Newly transplanted Portland writer Molly Jane Quinn’s blog Unhappy Hipsters lampoons stylish architecture photos with captions of existential dread. Now she’s in print: It’s Lonely in the Modern World (Chronicle, $20). The book keeps the mood light but adds a serious design manual for the wannabe-modernist. —Ashleigh Westmoreland

sauces
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EAT THIS NOW Bow down, Sriracha! You have been defeated—by new ramen shop Boke Bowl’s searingly awesome, complex house-made hot sauces! (Bonus: local firm Always With Honor’s clever branding.) bokebowl.com

Animal Eyes
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BAND OF THE MINUTE The Alaska boys in Animal Eyes mix brooding indie folk with accordion-powered oomph. Jan 10 at Bunk Bar; Jan 26 at Kelly’s Olympian

nature city
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BIG IDEA When New York’s Museum of Modern Art assigned five architecture firms to reenvision suburbia, WorkAC landed humble Keizer, outside of Salem, as a canvas. The NYC firm’s bold result is Nature-City, a neighborhood/ecological reserve with five times the human density, three times the public open space, and 17 times the tax revenue of the suburb’s current big-box stores. MoMA’s Foreclosed exhibit opens in February; this theoretical remake isn’t likely to become reality. “There may never be a client,” WorkAC’s Dan Wood says. “But we worked hard to make this economically feasible. It’s not utopia.”

Image: WORKAC
antlers
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WORKSHOP The year-old Portland brand Antler & Co makes witty, eye-catching shelves and mobiles out of … antlers ($50–130). So where do they get the horns of plenty? “There’s a network of dealers,” says founder Greg Hennes. “It’s a strange, funny subculture, but there are people who are very serious about collecting antlers, and some have gone commercial.” The horns, Hennes assures, are all naturally shed (i.e., peacefully found on the ground). antlerandco.com

yellow clock
unhappy hipster
sauces
Animal Eyes
nature city
antlers

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