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Kim Hummer, research leader and curator at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository, with a young quince tree.

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Seeds of a Marion blackberry.

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Joseph Postman, plant pathologist and curator at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository, holds a young pear tree.

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Hazelnuts, which make up one of the repository’s eight major living crop collections.

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Mint clones growing in vitro.

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A small pear-tree clone shows its graft just above the pruning marks.

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Seeds of a blackberry relative.

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Plants recently imported from foreign countries are grown in the repository’s quarantine greenhouse, where they are isolated from other related species until certified to be free of pests or diseases by an inspector from the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

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The Rubus greenhouse, where each pair of pots contains a unique raspberry or blackberry clone.

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