Picea abies 'Acrocona'
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Acrocona Norway spruce (Picea abies ‘Acrocona’) with gorgeous hot pinky-purple new cones

Picea likiangensis
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Likiang spruce (Picea likiangensis) with heavy cone set the year after being moved. Conifers sometimes react to stress by trying to reproduce.

Abies koreana 'Silver Show'
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Silver Show Korean fir (Abies koreana ‘Silver Show’) – Don tells me that, in the weeks since this photo was taken, it has grown beautiful new purple cones. What a combination!

a diversity of cones on Picea abies 'Pusch'
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Here you can easily see a diversity of female cones, both new and old, on one tree. Do you see any male cones? This is Pusch Norway spruce (Picea abies ‘Pusch’).

Don with largest Silberlocke Korean fir
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Proprietor and conifer expert Don Howse standing in front of the oldest Silberlocke Korean fir on the West Coast (tall silvery tree in backdrop). He holds a start of an even more silvery, choice Korean fir in his hands, propagated from his large Silberlocke tree. (For covetous conifer collectors, this treasure, now named Porterhowse Bonanza, is currently under production and should soon be available for sale.)

Picea abies 'Acrocona'
Picea likiangensis
Abies koreana 'Silver Show'
a diversity of cones on Picea abies 'Pusch'
Don with largest Silberlocke Korean fir
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