Warehouse
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OHS board president Jerry Hudson (left) and interim executive director Kerry Tymchuck inside the “Oregon Vault.”

Theater booth
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Fox Theatre Booth: This box office began life at the Heilig, a 1908 vaudeville theater that helped define Portland’s glitzy Art Deco theater row. In 1954, the building became the Fox Theatre, and in 1979 part of a growing movie house chain developed by ex-boxer Tom Moyer. Moyer tore it down in 1997 to build the 27-story Fox Tower.

Diving suit
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Diving Suit: Portland-born F. Harold Maiken (1912–1991), an ex-marine and longtime diver, not only pioneered the use of underwater cameras and televisions, he built this diving suit himself in his garage. His company, Commerical Divers, helped construct and demolish numerous bridges and dams along the Columbia and Willamette.

Model
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Architectural Model: Long before computer-aided design, architects and planners used models, scores of which are archived by OHS. This one from 1982 shows a segment of the MAX light-rail line in the Lloyd District. Built with money originally earmarked for an I-405-sized highway to Mount Hood, the MAX line was the beginning of Portland’s innovative transportation planning history.

Trojan Control Panel
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Trojan Control Panel: Salvaged from the plant that had once put “2,500 atomic bombs worth of radiation at Portland’s doorstep,” this control panel stands as a monument to a failed phase of Oregon energy policy. In 1968 the Trojan power plant ushered in a new era of cheap “thermal” energy, alongside new coal plants like Boardman. PGE aggressively combatted the mass protests and sit-ins—but finally decommissioned it in 1993. Boardman faces a similar fate.

Body Wagon
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Body Wagon: Donated in 1986 with a wicker casket still inside, wagons like this were used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to transport corpses from the place of death to the embalming table. When the body was ready for the funeral, a ceremonial hearse took its place. The wagon belonged to Donelson, Sewell, & Mathews Mortuary in Hillsboro, which is still in operation today.

Desk
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Tom McCall’s Desk & Typewriter: Few workstations have played more pivotal roles in our history than this rolltop and its accompanying Royal typewriter. Here, during two terms as governor, 1967–75, Tom McCall authored a legacy of environmentalism and conservation still being enjoyed four decades later.

Canning Machine
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Tuna Canning Machine: In 1899, the humble Columbia River Packers Associations in Astoria began feeding Portland’s appetite with fresh-packed salmon. But when the Great Depression brought Alaska salmon runs to a screeching halt, the company began packing cheaper tuna with this Pak-Shaper. And, thus, the tuna-juggernaut Bumble Bee Foods was born.

Ledger
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Ledger: This account ledger from the Yasui family’s general store in Hood River is an uncomfortable reminder of FDR’s infamous Executive Order 9066, which sent thousands of local Japanese immigrants and children to internment camps in Idaho, leaving behind everything they couldn’t carry. In 1991, the Yasui family donated the remaining items from their store to OHS.

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Trojan Control Panel
Body Wagon
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