UBC Bot Gdn path
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Woodsy pathways through the David C. Lam Asian garden at the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden in Vancouver, BC

Cardiocrinum giganteum
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A large patch of the fabled giant Himalayan lily (Cardiocrinum giganteum), a fragrant, eight-foot tall lily that takes seven years to bring to flower – then dies! (Luckily, it makes babies before it croaks.)

Carpinus fangiana
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This rare hop hornbeam tree (Carpinus fangiana) has stunning green catkins and these delectable crimpled leaves… the plant is so tasty that it graces the cover of "The Jade Garden: New & Notable Plants from Asia", a book written by UBC Botanical Garden staff about plants studied in the garden.

Sinocalycanthus sinensis
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Sinocalycanthus sinensis, a large, lovely deciduous shrub with summertime flowers that resemble single camellias from afar. Very lovely in autumn when the leaves turn yellow too.

Deinanthe bifida
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Dienanthe bifida, a hydrangea relative with exquisitely formed flowers – and the buds are at least as lovely! It makes a lovely low shrubbery (about 3-4’ tall and plenty wider with time) for a part sun or shade area.

Alangium platanifolium
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This lovely little tree – Alangium platanifolium – has marvelously scented, intricately formed little flowers that dangle below the big, tropical-looking leaves – perfect for lying or sitting underneath and looking up at.

Meliosma myriantha
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Meliosma myriantha, looking for all the world like a lilac or privet from afar, but with the most stunning and sweet fragrance – in mid-summer! Very pretty and unusual and, so far, I haven’t seen it in any local gardens. Look at that foliage – nice, eh?

Hydrangea aspera subsp. sargentiana
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Hydrangea aspera subsp. sargentiana – definitely one of the prettiest forms of this sometimes variable plant. Love the downy foliage and stems, as well as those tight little cauliflower-like heads of flowers that open up mauvy-lilac. Yum.

Hydrangea heteromalla
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How about a 15-foot tree-form lacecap hydrangea capable of growing a six-inch diameter trunk? Consider Hydrangea heteromalla. Ever heard of it?

Lonicera crassifolia
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Lonicera crassifolia makes a pretty little evergreen groundcover… but I don’t see it around that much because everyone’s too busy planting invasive and boring things like vinca!

Schefflera delavayi
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I think I found a rare Schefflera delavayi hidden in the shrubbery and discreetly unlabeled. This is one of the largest plants I’ve seen (about 8’ tall or more), and is likely one of the first to have been planted in North America.

Rhododendron kesangiae
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There were lots of rare rhododendrons with exquisite foliage… even without the flowers, Rhododendron kesangiae would be a wonderful addition to any shady garden. Very tropical-looking!

gate to the other side
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The gate to the other side… more to come!

UBC Bot Gdn path
Cardiocrinum giganteum
Carpinus fangiana
Sinocalycanthus sinensis
Deinanthe bifida
Alangium platanifolium
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Meliosma myriantha
Hydrangea aspera subsp. sargentiana
Hydrangea heteromalla
Lonicera crassifolia
Schefflera delavayi
Rhododendron kesangiae
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gate to the other side
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