raccoon
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A juvenile raccoon takes refuge in a small storm-water pipe protruding from the slough’s banks.

Image: Mark Gamba
blue heron
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Great blue herons are commonly spotted along the Columbia Slough; the watershed houses a heron rookery of some 85 nests.

Image: Mark Gamba
quiet slough
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THE QUIET SIDE Popular with birders, thanks to wetlands that provide habitat for numerous species, the Big Four Corners region of the Columbia Slough is a little-known wild spot in the city.

Image: Mark Gamba
green canyon
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GREEN CANYON After it rushes headlong from the Coast Range, the 80-mile-long Tualatin River meanders more slowly through veritable canyons of trees.

Image: Mark Gamba
Green heron
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Smaller than the great blue herons often seen on the Tualatin River, the green heron is identified by its glossy greenish cap.

Image: Mark Gamba
raccoon
blue heron
quiet slough
green canyon
Green heron
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