Oregon Film Museum
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OREGON FILM MUSEUM
The city’s history may stretch back for centuries, but in some circles Astoria’s biggest claim to fame is serving as the setting for The Goonies. Housed in the jail used in the film’s opening scene, this museum is an altar for Gooniephiles, with props, original scripts, and memorabilia. Some of the city’s other cinematic achievements, such as Kindergarten Cop and Free Willy, are also chronicled here.

Columbian Cafe
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COLUMBIAN CAFÉ
The white-bearded, endearingly surly owner Uriah Hulsey has been running this eccentric lunch counter for 31 years, creating a can’t-miss Astorian destination with his unexpected mix of fresh crêpes, just-off-the-boat seafood, and shockingly spicy vegetarian fare.

Commodore Hotel
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COMMODORE HOTEL
From its creaky waterfront piers to decades-old broadcasts like "Scandinavian Hour" on local radio station KMUN, Astoria is an old soul that wears fishing line more easily than trends. Juxtaposed against this barnacled backdrop is the Commodore Hotel. Opened in 1924, the hotel was shuttered in the mid-1960s, only to be purchased intact (cobweb-draped cocktail glasses still on the bar) in 2008. Thanks to a remodel that echoes Portland’s utilitarian Ace Hotel, the Commodore now wears a stylish friendly charm. All it needs is the next generation of Astoria noir.

Betty Lou
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BETTY LOU JEAN CO
This pocket-sized boutique and consignment shop next to the Commodore Hotel holds a surprisingly vast array of premium denim on its cleverly merchandised shelves. Even better, they’ll give you 20 percent off jeans when you bring in pair they can resell.

Drina Daisy
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DRINA DAISY
When Astoria’s fog clamps down, you’ll find no better consolation than Drina Daisy’s Bosnian-style comfort food. Owner Fordinka Kanlic makes meals much like she did in her restaurant outside Sarajevo for more than 30 years, roasting whole, tender young lambs on a spit; baking fresh bread; and stewing richly spiced beef goulash. With a half-liter of Karlova?ko Croatian pilsner and a seat near the kitchen, any meal here can turn a gray day in Astoria into the best damn foggy afternoon you’ve ever had.

Hotel Elliot
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HOTEL ELLIOTT
Built in 1924 (and remodeled in 2003), this Art Deco hotel places you in the heart of downtown, within easy walking distance of almost every restaurant, museum, waterfront bar, and kooky used bookshop in town.

Coffee Girl
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THE COFFEE GIRL
Some of the coast’s best storm-watching seats can be found inside Astoria’s intimate Coffee Girl, a coffee shop perched on Pier 39, home to the West’s oldest Cannery. From behind the original 1875 counter, the Coffee Girl’s baristas serve artfully decorated lattes made with Seattle roaster Caffe D’Arte beans. Add an enormous slab of lemon bread or an oversize coconut-mango scone (made on site, of course) to your crème brûlée latte and pull up a seat at one of the wall-sized picture windows. Wipe down your pane (squeegees are provided), kick back to Etta James’ rich refrains, and revel in the warmth while Neptune stirs up the water just outside.

CRMM
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COLUMBIA RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM
For anyone who wants to understand Astoria’s deep connection with the cold waters at its edge, this museum is a must-do. Here, the ocean’s timeless danger and romance are juxtaposed against the radical evolution of seafaring technology since the 19th century. Beautifully crafted exhibits drop you in the middle of the aquatic action, including creaky, deep-sea fishing vessels, giant commercial tankers, and a dramatic Coast Guard rescue.

Bowpickers
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BOWPICKER FISH & CHIPS
Arguably the best fish and chips this side of the Thames, Astoria’s only food cart, located directly across from the Columbia River Maritime Museum, serves up steaming heaps of beer-battered albacore tuna and steak-cut fries from a converted gillnet boat.

Image: Bowpicker
Vintage Hardware
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VINTAGE HARDWARE
If Rejuvenation and The Rebuilding Center had a coastal cousin, it’d be Vintage Hardware. Occupying the bottom floor of the former Astor Hotel, this treasure hunters paradise holds 19th and 20th century fixtures, side tables, doors, and lamps … and a sizable collection of other intriguing rusted somethings.

Farmhouse Funk
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FARMHOUSE FUNK
Just down the street from Vintage Hardware, sits Astoria’s version of Mississippi Avenue’s Porch Light or Flutter. Farmhouse Fun’s curated collection of antiques and home decor (mason jars and homemade pillows, anyone?) mingles with modern day accessories, clothing, and even tack and saddles, giving you about, oh, about a million different (stylish) ways to part with your pennies.

Fort Stevens
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FORT STEVENS
From the 19th century through World War II, the Columbia River’s deep reach into the country’s interior made it a no-brainer target for potential invaders. As such, the waterway was heavily fortified and vigorously defended from Fort Stevens. Now a serene 4,200-acre park, this erstwhile stronghold guarding the mouth of the river is still littered with barracks, bunkers, and gun batteries, all evidence of its martial past, plus shipwrecks like that of the Peter Iredale (pictured).

Cannery Pier
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CANNERY PIER HOTEL
Built on the original pilings of the Union Fish Cannery (established in 1897), this lavish hotel marries turn-of-the century charm with modern comfort. Historic photographs festoon the lobby walls while floor-to-ceiling windows practically put you in the Columbia River and on the passing freighters. Come evening, local historians, bar pilots, and prominent Astorians regale guests with tales from the city’s industrial past.

Fort George Public House
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FORT GEORGE BREWERY
What started as a small scale brewing operation in 2007 hit the big time last summer, when Fort George moved into a historic 30,000 square foot building, allowing the purveyors of the beloved Vortex IPA to up their production and debut a collection of microbrews in 16-ounce cans. This month they’re celebration of stouts ensures you’ll never find fewer than eight hefty dark, delicious beers on tap—perfect for washing down winter.

Blue Scorcher
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BLUE SCORCHER BAKERY & CAFÉ
Hip, bright, and erected next to the site of the original Fort of Astoria, Blue Scorcher serves toothsome pastries, breads, and cakes using vegetarian and local ingredients. Don’t miss the freshly baked cinnamon rolls or the famous house-spiced chai. Or, if your Fort Stevens hike has left you famished, try the French toast, made from inch-thick slabs of challah bread and doused with syrup and seasonal-fruit jam.

Astoria Column
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ASTORIA COLUMN
Standing high on a hill overlooking the city, this colorful, 125-foot column was erected in 1926 to commemorate the history of westward expansion. It’s adorned with 14 murals depicting great moments in pioneer history, such as the discovery of the Columbia River in 1792. Climb to the top of the column’s winding steel staircase for breathtaking views of the river and the town below, and a prime spot for your own modern-day reflections.

Oregon Film Museum
Columbian Cafe
Commodore Hotel
Betty Lou
Drina Daisy
Hotel Elliot
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Coffee Girl
CRMM
Bowpickers
Vintage Hardware
Farmhouse Funk
Fort Stevens
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Cannery Pier
Fort George Public House
Blue Scorcher
Astoria Column
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