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Three Egyptian Heads
Two centuries ago, Egyptian mummies were frequently cut into pieces and sold, often to tourists. These Egyptian mummy heads are part of the Mummies of the World exhibition, the largest traveling exhibition of mummies and artifacts ever assembled.
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Nes?pa?kai?schuti
This is the mummy and sarcophagus of an Egyptian Priest named Nes?pa?kai-schuti, who played a role in the Egyptian religious hierarchy 2,650 years ago. The sarcophagus is made from sycamore wood and decorated with detailed paintings. Beautiful and extensive hieroglyphics tell us his name, his family heritage and his occupation. The inner coffin illustrates stages of the dead man’s journey into the afterlife.
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The Detmold Child
This Peruvian child mummy is in a remarkable state of preservation, radiocarbon dated to 4504– 4457 B.C. – more than 3,000 years before the birth of King Tut. The child, which was about 10 months old when it died, naturally mummified in the hot, arid desert environment.
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Michael Orlovits
Michael Orlovits (1765-1806) is part of a naturally mummified family found in a church crypt in the town of Vác, Hungary in 1994. The crypt was established in 1729 and sealed in 1838, and a combination of relative humidity, ventilation, temperature and the pine coffins helped to preserve the bodies.
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Howler Monkey
This howler monkey is from the site of Grand Chaco, in Argentina, South America. It has not been radiocarbon dated, but it is likely that the monkey was naturally preserved in the warm, dry environment of the area and prepared for display, with a rhea feather skirt and feather wreath around its head and neck.
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Howler Monkey
This howler monkey is from the site of Grand Chaco, in Argentina, South America. It has not been radiocarbon dated, but it is likely that the monkey was naturally preserved in the warm, dry environment of the area and prepared for display, with a rhea feather skirt and feather wreath around its head and neck.
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Egyptian Male Mummy
This is the mummy of an adult male who was unwrapped long after his mummification. Samples of the mummy were taken for radiocarbon dating, and analysis shows this man lived around 2,350 years ago. Analysis of CT scans suggests this man was 35 to 40 years old at the time of his death, was around 5 feet seven inches tall, and had some arthritis. The man received a high-quality embalming, so he was probably a person of high status.
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Nes?pa?kai?schuti
This is the mummy and sarcophagus of an Egyptian Priest named Nes?pa?kai-schuti, who played a role in the Egyptian religious hierarchy 2,650 years ago. The sarcophagus is made from sycamore wood and decorated with detailed paintings. Beautiful and extensive hieroglyphics tell us his name, his family heritage and his occupation. The inner coffin illustrates stages of the dead man’s journey into the afterlife.
9 of 11
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The Detmold Child
This Peruvian child mummy is in a remarkable state of preservation, radiocarbon dated to 4504– 4457 B.C. – more than 3,000 years before the birth of King Tut. The child, which was about 10 months old when it died, naturally mummified in the hot, arid desert environment.
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The Tattooed Woman
This young woman with long, black hair was naturally mummified in the warm desert air, seated in the burial position typical in Chile before 1400 A.D. She was wrapped in fabric after her death, the impression of which is still visible on her chin and cheeks. She has unusual tattoos; an oval with a dot inside on both breasts and beneath the left corner of her mouth. Little is known about the meaning of these mysterious tattoos.
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Hyena Mummy
This striped hyena, native to northern and eastern Africa, the Middle East and India, was found in the Dabié Cave in Jordan in 2004. It was naturally preserved in the dry cave environment; radiocarbon dating has found it to be less than 50 years old.
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