October 2010
Table of Contents
Cover Story
Whether you're a seasoned explorer, or even a Willamette Valley vino newbie, we've got the travel tips.
Features
Thumbnail for - The Trainer
In 2006, Oregon Zoo trainer Philip Fensterer took an unlikely stumble into the big-cat kingdom and never quite made it out of the den.
Thumbnail for - East Side Rising
While the nightly news bemoans sluggish job-growth rates, stubborn unemployment, and, potentially, a long and irreversible decline, the 700 acres of Portland's Central Eastside are blooming with counter-cyclical optimism.
Thumbnail for - Grass At My Feet
Gretchen Flesher Duggan’s "Grass at My Feet" is the winner of the 2010 Wordstock Short Fiction Competition.
Thumbnail for - Tasting Notes
Condé Cox provides an oenophile’s wisdom when it comes to Oregon wines in this month’s Web Exclusive.
Thumbnail for - For the Newcomer
For newcomers—and procrastinators—here are the tastes and activities that should be on every Willamette Valley virgin’s shortlist.
Thumbnail for - For the Pioneering Palate
Umpqua and Rogue valley vintages are both less renowned and further away, but the tastes are worth the travel.
Thumbnail for - For the Active Traveler
If your wine tasting weekend needs more action than a stroll around the vineyard, the Columbia River Gorge is the place for you.
Thumbnail for - For the Foodie
The lush northern Willamette Valley soil is good for growing more than just grapes, so pair your wine tasting with the memorable of meals.
Thumbnail for - For the Value Hunter
The Eola-Amity Hills AVA offers affordable winetasting with a lot of bang for your buck.
Thumbnail for - Ask a Guru
The questions that matter when it comes to wine tasting in Oregon.
Thumbnail for - Shape Shifters
For this month's fall fashion, think of the iconic silhouettes of past decades, redone.
FOR MORE THAN 10 YEARS, the corner of NE MLK Jr. Boulevard and E Burnside Street, otherwise known as the "Burnside Bridgehead," has awaited a new identity. Former Mayor Vera Katz dreamed of a "world-class" work of architecture standing as a...
With nearly every imaginable bit of the pig finding its way onto Portland restaurant menus, we may have to consider switching the _t_ to a _k_ in our city’s name.
Condé Cox provides an oenophile’s wisdom when it comes to Oregon wines in this month’s Web Exclusive.
Autumn in Hood River sees a delicately delicious mix of pear harvest and Oregon black cod.
The Country Cat serves summer all year long with their Skeet Tea, an uncomplicatedly delicious cocktail made with black tea infused vodka.
Fin
Newly opened Fin serves only sustainably-caught Pacific seafood, mixing Mediterranean, Asian, and South American influences to create bold combinations of flavor and texture.
The menu at new Portland eatery Dick's Kitchen focuses on classic diner fare like burgers, sausages, and sandwiches, but with a twist: beef is local and grass-fed; buns, ketchup, mustard, and special sauces are made in-house; fries are not...
For newcomers—and procrastinators—here are the tastes and activities that should be on every Willamette Valley virgin’s shortlist.
Umpqua and Rogue valley vintages are both less renowned and further away, but the tastes are worth the travel.
If your wine tasting weekend needs more action than a stroll around the vineyard, the Columbia River Gorge is the place for you.
The lush northern Willamette Valley soil is good for growing more than just grapes, so pair your wine tasting with the memorable of meals.
The questions that matter when it comes to wine tasting in Oregon.
Newcomer Day Trip: Hawks View Cellar ?When former Ten 01 sommelier Erica Landon became hospitality and sales director at Hawks View Cellars last year, she put the young winery on the map. Hawks View, which made its first vintage in 2007, is...
Gretchen Flesher Duggan’s "Grass at My Feet" is the winner of the 2010 Wordstock Short Fiction Competition.
A random Wednesday afternoon survey at Director Park
Mario's is one of the trendiest men's fashion boutiques in the city. Find out how owner Mario Bisio has succeeded so magnificently at capturing the upscale men's market in both Portland and Seattle.
In May, John Brodie and Blair Saxon-Hill opened Monograph Bookwerks, a cozy shop in the Alberta Arts district , stocking an array of books on modern and contemporary art and architecture, out-of-print titles from around the world, and small runs...
For this month's fall fashion, think of the iconic silhouettes of past decades, redone.
Located just 30 minutes from downtown Portland, Oxbow Regional Park remains a surprisingly untamed destination. Red foxes, blacktail deer, bald eagles, blue herons—even black bears and cougars—roam among the 1,200-acre expanse. But it’s the wa
Whether you're a seasoned explorer, or even a Willamette Valley vino newbie, we've got the travel tips.
The Eola-Amity Hills AVA offers affordable winetasting with a lot of bang for your buck.
On November 2, voters will elect either Chris Dudley or John Kitzhaber to be Oregon’s 37th governor. But what we get is the man and the folks who advise him. Here’s a look at some insiders shaping the next guv’s message, if not the candidate.
In June, Michael Czysz debuted the all-electric MotoCzysz E1pc zero-emission race bike at the TT Zero competition at the renowned Isle of Man TT Races. The E1pc clocked a nearly silent 94.6 mph course average.
In 2006, Oregon Zoo trainer Philip Fensterer took an unlikely stumble into the big-cat kingdom and never quite made it out of the den.
Consider the colors you’ll want to see next spring—because it’s bulb-planting time! Daffodils, tulips, crocuses, and other bulbs grow best when you plant them from late September to October, giving roots time to establish before winter arrives.
A new streetcar may divide two of Portland’s toniest bedroom communities. If transit-savvy politicians and developers have their way, by 2017 sleek new streetcars will roll through Dunthorpe and Lake Oswego several times an hour.
While the nightly news bemoans sluggish job-growth rates, stubborn unemployment, and, potentially, a long and irreversible decline, the 700 acres of Portland's Central Eastside are blooming with counter-cyclical optimism.