December 2007
Table of Contents
Cover Story
When you first reluctantly handed him over to his kindergarten teacher, your heart pounded. When he graduates years from now, you’ll breathe a sigh of relief. After all, the fact that your child is standing there, diploma in hand, is largely because of y
Features
Thumbnail for - Progress Report
IT WAS A ROUGH YEAR for the Oregon Department of Education. The agency released incorrect statewide student test scores in October owing to a software programming error. And after ODE became embroiled in a protracted dispute with its online...
Thumbnail for - Calling the Shots
So he replaced the "Jail Blazers" with a squad of do-gooders, including superstar Greg Oden. Now that Oden is benched, will Portlanders stay in Pritchard's court?
Thumbnail for - The Creek
The winning story from the 2008 Wordstock Short Fiction Competition will be published in our upcoming December issue.
ONE OF THE BENEFITS of being editor-in-chief is that every now and then I get to sneak my children onto the cover of the magazine. That little guy with his arm hanging out of the bus window on this month’s cover? He’s my 8-year-old, Willam, along...
DON’T GET US WRONG we’re all about glad tidings. But the mere thought of trolling for a parking spot at the Lloyd Center, or standing in post office lines that stretch out like spools of ribbon before us, is enough to put a damper on even the...
FOR ALMOST A CENTURY, up until the 1960s, most domestic oysters hailed from back East—in the Chesapeake Bay, for instance, where weathered oystermen with gnarly beards, calloused hands and thick Eastern Shore accents harvested them with hulking...
IN HIS JAMES BEARD Award-winning book Classic Home Desserts, the late cookbook author and food journalist Richard Sax included an old English recipe from 1588 that called for “ten faire Quinces … an once of Sinamon [and] a pounde and a...
  When shopping for quinces to cook with, it’s best to buy them hard—a soft quince will be mealy. Some mottling of the skin is fine, as is some of the quince’s signature bumpiness, but quinces that aren’t completely yellow should be allowed to...
Traditional kombucha tea promises long life; when it’s bottled by Tazo’s co-founder, it tastes good, too.
TAPAS MENUS, BY DESIGN, are destined to please just about any gastronome. Why? Because they offer a uniquely broad array of choices that give you a strong sense of control when it comes to your dining experience. It’s not just that you’re able...
WITH PORTLAND’S ROADS increasingly crowded by an army of pedaling commuters, couriers and leisure cyclists, it was only a matter of time before the drive-thru became a bike-thru. One of the city’s first bike-thru cafés can be found at the aptly...
FORGET EVERYTHING you think you know about tofu—unless you already know that tofu can, when prepared right, be silky and luscious and light enough to melt on your tongue. That trick is precisely what makes the classic Korean tofu soup known as...
ITS NAME TRANSLATES to “gray salt,” and, yes, the walls of this relatively new restaurant on SE Hawthorne Blvd are also gray, but Sel Gris is anything but dreary or drab. In fact, the warm lighting, numerous candles, classy-yet-quirky artwork and...
YES, THAT’S A REAL BEARD. And it belongs to 51-year-old Vancouverite Robert Figley, “Santa” to most. But Figley is no shabby mall version: This Santa-for-hire heads the Washington/Oregon chapter of the Amalgamated Order of Real Bearded Santas, a...
ONLY IN A PLACE as unabashedly heart-on-its-sleeve as Portland could a political consultant utter the phrase, “We want to help people change the world,” and not make listeners want to upchuck. But even if Kari Chisholm lived in a place as...
FIVE YEARS AGO, while perched in a chairlift high above Colorado’s Arapahoe Basin ski area, I spotted a peculiar figure amidst the Alpine skiers bombing down the hill: a man seemingly genuflecting to the mountain as he gracefully glided down...
DEBBIE STOLLER is the New York-based editor of third-wave feminist magazine Bust, but she’s headed to Portland this month on behalf of her latest book, Son of Stitch ‘N Bitch, the fourth entry in a series of crafty volumes that extol the virtues...
“Most of Chris’s art makes me happy,” writes Sean Kennerly in an introduction to Please Listen I Have Something to Tell You about What Is (Alleged Press), a new book about the art of Chris Johanson, whose gnomic paintings, drawings and...
MY BROTHER CALLED with the news around 10 a.m. on September 23: A fire had struck the home of our good friends Michael Brophy and Holly Cundiff early that morning. They’d barely made it out alive, bolting out the front door—she’d donned a shawl;...
When you first reluctantly handed him over to his kindergarten teacher, your heart pounded. When he graduates years from now, you’ll breathe a sigh of relief. After all, the fact that your child is standing there, diploma in hand, is largely...
So he replaced the "Jail Blazers" with a squad of do-gooders, including superstar Greg Oden. Now that Oden is benched, will Portlanders stay in Pritchard's court?
The winning story from the 2008 Wordstock Short Fiction Competition will be published in our upcoming December issue.
IN THE cats-versus-dogs debate, feline fans invariably cite kitties’ low-maintenance needs in their arguments. So you’d think that, when it comes to accessories, these uncomplicated companions would be content with a ball of yarn, a paper bag or...
WHEN SPORTS GIANT Nike sets its mind to marketing a shoe—like, say, the Air Jordan—success in the form of windfall profits and brand recognition generally follow (excepting, of course, that whole Michael Vick sneaker debacle). But every now and...
IT MAY BILL ITSELF as a “neighborhood fabric boutique,” but Bolt is more than just a material source for Portland’s legions of crafty DIY-ers. The Alberta Street store also unspools the inspiration for the projects themselves: That Liberty of...
Being a television news reporter in Portland requires fancy footwork. And sensible footwear.
"IF IT SEEMS BARREN,” the publicist for L.L. Stub Stewart Memorial State Park told me before I drove west to visit the attraction, which opened this summer in the Coast Range, “just try to imagine what it will look like when the trees and the...
Looking for the authentic New York City? Then get thee to Brooklyn, where neighborhoods in transition are defining the Big Apple’s future.
MAYBE IT’S OUR laid-back, coffee-shop culture. Or our lack of more than one major professional sports team. Or maybe it’s our tendency to shut down the city when more than four snowflakes appear. Whatever the reason, in some circles, Portland...
WITH FEWER THAN 30 days left to find the perfect trinket to place under the tree or menorah, Portland’s boutique rows are packed with intrepid present-seekers. Nothing will deter these dauntless shoppers from their quest—neither rain nor sleet...
You write that you thought washing dishes was torture when you were a kid. How do you define torture in your new book, Torture and Democracy? Torture requires four things. You need a method for causing pain; a duly authorized public official; a...
CROSSING THE checkpoint at the Portland Shipyard, on the tip of Swan Island, is like wandering into an industrial ghost town. The piers are littered with crumbling asphalt, and massive cranes brood over the waterfront like frozen herons, their...
YES, WE KNOW it can be difficult to resist the low price tag that sparkling wine often sports, especially in the wake of all that holiday spending. But the truth is domestic sparklers don’t even come close to trumping a superb bottle of...
Modern furnishing plus a color scheme of subdued purples and aquas, lift a 1920s-era living room into the present. Image: Jon Jensen BORN IN ENGLAND in the wake of the Industrial Revolution, the Arts & Crafts movement...
IT WAS A ROUGH YEAR for the Oregon Department of Education. The agency released incorrect statewide student test scores in October owing to a software programming error. And after ODE became embroiled in a protracted dispute with its online...