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Pete Brock

Most high schools would be happy just to polish a couple of league championship trophies for their display cases. Not Jesuit. Since 1967, the Crusaders have amassed 88 state titles and 229 league titles in 20 different men’s and women’s sports. Sports Illustrated recognized Jesuit’s pedigree in 2007—the school won five state championships that year—calling the Beaverton school’s athletic program tops in the nation; this July, the mag ranked Jesuit No. 2. The dual honors made us curious about just what kind of wunderkinds have rolled off the private school’s athletic assembly line in the past few decades. Turns out, a lot: in the past three years alone, more than 35 Jesuit alums have scored Division I athletic scholarships. Here’s a highlight reel of three athletes who carried the Crusaders’ torch well past their high school glory days.

Pete Brock ’72

FOOTBALL, OFFENSIVE CENTER

’71: The 6-foot-5 Oregon All-State squad member clears a path for Jesuit’s eighth league title.

’72: Pete Brock ’72 Football, offensive center

’75: The University of Colorado senior plays in the Hula Bowl All-Star game, but a bum ankle sidelines his plans for the Japan Bowl.

’76: First-round draft pick for the New England Patriots

’86: Tapped as Miller Lite’s NFL lineman of the year, the Pats lifer ends his 12-year career the next season.

’87: The first of Spoelstra’s two consecutive state playoff appearances for Jesuit

 

Erik Spoelstra ’88

BASKETBALL, POINT GUARD

 

’92: As a four-year starting point guard at the University of Portland, Spoelstra becomes the Pilots’ third-place career assist leader, with 488.

’95: Thanks to the influence of his dad (NBA exec Jon Spoelstra), he scores a gig as the Miami Heat’s scout video coordinator.

 

Laura Schott ’99

SOCCER, FORWARD

 

’99: Graduates Jesuit having never lost a game, including four state title matches

’01: Plays on the US women’s national team at the Algarve Cup, where the team only managed fifth place

’02: Breaks Cal Berkeley’s record for goals scored with 56

’03: Along with teammate Mia Hamm, Schott wins the WUSA title during rookie season with the Washington Freedom.

’08: Miami all-star Dwayne Wade rings Spoelstra with good news: he’s the Heat’s newest head coach (and at 37, also the NBA’s youngest).

’08: As rookie head coach at Portland State, turns in the best-ever results of a first-year Vikings coach: a 4-1-2 conference record

’09: Still a Patriot, Brock voices pre- and post-game analysis for Boston’s WBCN 104.1.